Pages Menu
Categories Menu

Ball and thread, old fashion hit

In the first half of the 19th century (the time of France Prešeren) Tržič was famous for its blue-coloured socks

 

In the first half of the 19th century (the time of France Prešeren) Tržič was famous for its blue-coloured socksIn the first half of the 19th century (the time of France Prešeren) Tržič was famous for its blue-coloured socks

Tržič was the sock-making centre of Slovenia. The earliest records of sock-makers date back to the 17th century and they were most numerous in the time of the poet Prešeren (first half of the 19th century). »A traveller who went through Tržič, felt like he was going through a double row of socks, spread out on a purposely made wooden boards in a shape of feet which were ment for sock drying.«

High wolly socks were made by men, women and children. Most of them were dyed blue. In the second half of the 19th century, men began to wear long trousers and sock-makers of Tržič went out of business in a few years.

You can help us knit a neverending sock and try to guess the names of the sock patterns.

 

Flax and sheep, wood and oil

 

Flax and sheep, wood and oilFlax and sheep, wood and oil

People sowed flax, spun thread from it and wove it into linen. They made cloth from wool. As Valvasor wrote, the people from Tržič were famous for mezlanu – a textile that was woven from flax and wool.

In the middle of the 19th century cotton fabric was used all the more often. In the market it was cheaper than linen. Later textiles were made from cellulose and synthetically derived fibres. Genuine silk is still prestigious nowadays.

You can see how different fibres, threads and fabrics look like, you can touch them and weave a carpet… You can watch a process of a flax seed becoming a linen and get to know interesting facts with the help of an audio fence.

 

The magic of indigo

 

The magic of indigoThe magic of indigo

Indigo-dyeing is a special way of hand-printing patterns on cloth that is dyed with indigo. We call it reserve or negative print. With the help of the model the sticky pulp is applied to the cloth. The pulp prevents the dye reaching the fabric.

In Tržič they dyed the linen that was brought by farmers and the cotton fabric they wove themselves. They were well-known for their indigo-printed cotton fabric.

A film will present the old way of printing and then you can adorn your own personal calendar with indigo patterns of Tržič, and see how people used to dress in Dolina above Tržič.

 

Children’s room

 

Children's roomChildren's room

Children can get to know heritage of Tržič through different interactions. They will see a dragon that used to clump about Košuta, they will see a blacksmith, woodworker and a shoe-maker doing their job and try themselves in doing the shoes the old way.

Back to the Permanent exhibitions

Pin It on Pinterest